What defines quality content?

When experts talk about content marketing, they often stress the need for quality, but what actually defines this? Let’s assume your content is already well written and free from embarrassing errors. Maybe you outsourced your content generation, or maybe you undertook the arduous challenge of building and managing a talented team of freelancers yourself. Quality does not have a universal definition, but here some factors you can look at.

Do you use other media when appropriate?

Many people respond more favourably to visual information than text, so it’s often wise to supplement textual information with illustrative images, infographics, and embedded videos. This can also be a factor in search engine rankings.

Is your content readable enough?

Readability metrics like the Flesch-Kincaid readability tests can help determine if your content is readable enough for your audience. For example, if you’re trying to reach teenagers, you do not want content with readability scores similar to a law textbook.

Is your content long (or short) enough?

You may be tempted to focus on longer content, because this is often favoured by search engines. Mobile users, however, like to be able to access information quickly, and this trend is growing year on year.

As a compromise, you could exclude unnecessary material to reduce the word count while also formatting the remaining content (e.g. using headings, lists, links, etc.) in a way that enables mobile users to easily locate relevant information.

Do you allow comments?

When readers add constructive comments to your content, it increases the overall quality for both search engines and your human visitors. You will need to moderate these comments, however, to exclude inflammatory remarks and spam posts with links to low quality websites. When done right, comments can solicit the level of engagement you ideally want from content marketing.

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