Visit Britain makes spelling mistake on US campaign poster

A high profile UK tourism campaign has been found to feature an unfortunate spelling mistake. The GREAT campaign, launched by Visit Britain, published posters on New York underground trains with the Welsh tourist spot Brecon Beacons incorrectly named ‘Breacon Beacons’.

The mistake is particularly unfortunate as the campaign, which has cost £25million, was designed to take advantage of the 2012 Olympic Games and the heightened publicity for the UK. The idea behind the campaign was to raise awareness of other UK locations worth visiting and to increase tourism.

The Department of Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS), responsible for the tourism drive, has stated that the error slipped through due to a proofreading mistake made by a US agency. The mistake was spotted before the London launch of the initiative, but the New York subway posters had already been published.

The misspelling is an example of the kind of error that can go unnoticed when dealing with unfamiliar names or words, or when the eye tricks us into thinking we’re reading the correct spelling. Even high-profile national campaigns are susceptible to the odd mistake, and the results can mean that the campaign becomes famous for the wrong reason.

Many website owners use the services of professional writers to help avoid this kind of error. Professional article services tend to use in-house editing to ensure that any small mistakes are noticed and corrected before the content is published, avoiding the attention that errors can attract.

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